Past FLC Topics

Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs)2016 - 2017 Topics | Past FLC Topics


2015-2016


2014-2015

2013-2014

2012-2013

2011-2012

2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

​2006-2007

​2005-2006

 



Faculty Learning Communities for 2015-2016

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.


A Community of Inquiry Exploring Active Learning Strategies and Spaces

Do you ever feel frustrated using active learning strategies due to space constraints in your classroom?

Join a Faculty Learning Community monthly conversation on active learning strategies and spaces starting this Fall, 2015.

Co-Facilitators:
Antoinette Tessmer
Dave Goodrich


Time & Location:

We will meet on the third Friday of the month right after the "Explorations in Instructional Technology Seminars" from 1:30pm to 2:30pm in Natural Science room #105.

Goals

  1. Cultivate a forum for faculty networking and inquiry around active learning strategies.
  2. Generate a common D2L space for faculty interested in active learning strategies to connect, collaborate, network and converse virtually outside of the monthly meeting.
  3. Gather MSU faculty case studies of active learning with resources and examples.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Academic Integrity and Ethics on Campus

Co-Facilitators:
Adele Denison
Shannon Burton

This FLC will strive to promote a culture of academic integrity and ethical conduct through fostering positive discussions related to integrating the theory and philosophy of academic integrity and ethical conduct throughout the university. In the upcoming year, this group will look to expand the dialog centering on academic integrity from the 2014/2015 and 2015/2016 FLCs to look at how academic integrity relates to ethics and conduct overall on campus and create additional resources to support faculty in educating about the importance of academic integrity. Proposed discussion topics would include the following: 1. Myths and realities regarding integrity on campus; 2. The connection between academic integrity and professional ethics; 3. Public perceptions of integrity; 4. The academic misconduct process; 5. Best practices in prevention and assessment of what?; 6. Addressing collaboration; 7. Managing difficult conversations related to integrity and ethics; 8. Mentoring and advising graduate students for integrity. To connect with this group, contact Adele denison4@msu.edu or Shannon sburton@msu.edu.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Accessibility through Creative Innovation

Co-Facilitators:
Cathleen McGreal
Stephen Thomas

The University has recently adopted high standards for accessibility that will ensure all faculty, staff, and students can access the knowledge, experiences, and opportunities here at MSU.  But what does that mean for professors?  What are the expectations for the curriculum you develop?  What resources are available to you?  What features of D2L enhance the creation of accessible courses?  What is the timeframe for implementing the policy?  The task of becoming accessible can seem daunting…unless you have a community of practice.  

Come join this Faculty Learning Community (FLC) and work with other professors/instructors/staff dedicated to creating and revising materials that can be used by everyone.  The focus of this FLC will be on Universal Design (UD) of which accessibility is one of the main components.  Your participation in the FLC will help bring you up to date on the current state of UD on campus, connect you to literature on the topic, and provide you some skills in creating accessible materials.  One of the best aspects of this FLC is that we will be working with IT Services to help identify the resources faculty and staff will need campus-wide.  So, come have a voice in accessibility support while you learn with your peers and build a network that will help support you in creating accessible experiences.

↑ BACK TO TOP


What Shapes the Way We Teach? Four Lenses for Critical Reflection

Co-Facilitators:
Sharon Ladenson
Cheryl Caesar

How can Stephen Brookfield’s “four lenses of critical reflection” – our own learning experiences, pedagogical literature, student responses and observations by colleagues – serve as tools for us to examine, question, develop and enhance our teaching practices? Our readings in Brookfield’s Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher, and written reflections by each group member, will form the basis of our discussions and eventual article.

Our audience encompasses anyone teaching college students, including semester-long courses and/or individual sessions (such as information literacy sessions in the library). Our critically reflective discussions would benefit faculty from across diverse disciplines. Whether teaching face-to-face or online, large lectures or small classes, all instructors and academic staff will benefit from participating in our conversations.

Through our poster presentation at the Spring Institute, we will reach the Spring Institute participants and other FLC members, of course, but through the final article, we hope to reach a much larger audience.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Enriching the Faculty-International Student Experience

Co-Facilitators:
Patricia Walters
Peter De Costa

↑ BACK TO TOP



Assessment, Instructional Best Practices and Continuous Improvement of Student Learning in General Science Education

Co-Facilitators:
Sarah Jardeleza
Julie Libarkin
Gabriel J. Ording

Sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education

↑ BACK TO TOP


Lilly Teaching Fellows 2.0

Co-Facilitators:
Joanna Bosse and Sara Miller (Fall Semester)
Christine Greenhow and Kristen Bieda (Spring Semester)

Sponsored by F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP


Teaching and Learning Abroad

Co-Facilitators:
Inge Steglitz
Jim Lucas

Sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education

↑ BACK TO TOP

 



Faculty Learning Communities for 2014-2015

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.


Assessment, Instructional Best Practices, and Continuous Improvement of Student Learning in General Science Education

Co-Facilitators:
Sarah Jardeleza, Adjunct Assistant Professor-Fixed Term, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science
Julie Libarkin, Associate Professor, Dept. of Geological Sciences and Associate Director of Education Research, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science
Gabriel J. Ording, Associate Professor, Dept. of Entomology and Director, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science

Collaborative discourse and research engaging all MSU faculty involved in assessment, best practices in curriculum development/instruction, and evidence-based continuous improvement of STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) related courses through the Center for Integrative Studies in General Science. These activities will result in Center-based Programmatic Assessment of Student Learning, instructional alignment with the MSU Undergraduate Learning Goals, and overall continuous improvement of gateway science courses for non-STEM majors.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Facilitating Collaboration: Creating a Diversity Hub

Co-Facilitators:
Rob Roznowski, Associate Professor-Tenure System, Theatre
Deric McNish, Assistant Professor-Tenure System, Theatre
Sponsored by F&OD. 

This FLC will focus on identifying strategies to create synergies between disparate and seemingly unconnected research projects and work towards creating a mechanism for connecting research projects and willing collaborative partners that promote diversity to offer enhanced perspectives.


FLC on Educating for Academic Integrity

Co-Facilitators:
Adele Denison, Associate Professor-Fixed Term, Physiology Natural Science
Christina Dokter, Adjunct Instructor-Fixed Term, Pharmacology Toxicology
Sponsored by F&OD.

This FLC will strive to promote a culture of academic integrity through fostering positive discussions related to integrating the theory and philosophy of academic integrity across the curriculum. Shannon Burton, Assistant Ombudsperson at MSU will also be integral in assisting with the vision of the group. 

↑ BACK TO TOP


Flipping the Class and Using a REAL (Room for Engaged and Active Learning) Space

Co-Facilitators:
Antoinette Tessmer, Instructor-Fixed Term, Finance
Jim Desler, Instructor-Fixed Term, English Language Center
Co-sponsored by IT Services and F&OD.

This FLC will explore two related topics:  using "Rooms for Engaged and Active Learning" (REAL) and "flipping" a class.  REALs are a relatively new addition to MSU, and this FLC will allow both new and more experienced users of those classrooms to share and assess various ways of using them to promote active and engaged learning.  A "flipped" class, one in which instruction takes place outside of class and what is traditionally considered as homework is done inside of class, goes hand in hand with using a REAL.  Therefore, this FLC will also explore ways of delivering content outside of the classroom so that more class time can be devoted to active learning rather than lecturing.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Learn2Design with Desire2Learn

Co-Facilitators:
Cathleen Erin McGreal, Professor-Fixed Term, Psychology Social Science
Jessica Knott, Information Technologist III/S, IT Services Teaching And Learning Tech
Co-sponsored by  IT Services and F&OD.

The goal of this FLC is enhancing student engagement and implementing effective course objectives by leveraging backward design through Desire2Learn.

↑ BACK TO TOP

 


Managing Complex Social and Environmental Problems through Collaborative and Systemic Approaches to Inquiry and Action

Co-Facilitators:
Miles McNall, Specialist - Research-Fixed Term, Community Evaluation & Research Collaborative
Shari Dann, Associate Professor-Tenure System, Department Of Community Sustainability
Sponsored by University Outreach & Engagement. 

The proposed focus of this learning community will be on effective approaches to working with communities to resolve complex social and environmental problems. Our review of the relevant literatures suggests that effective approaches combine two key orientations: (1) collaborative approaches to inquiry and action (e.g, participatory action research, community-based participatory research, and participatory evaluation) and (2) systemic approaches to conceptualizing and representing complex problems (e.g., system dynamics modeling and soft systems methodology). A key concern of this learning community will be how universities can form partnerships with communities to pursue collaborative and systemic approaches to tackling complex community-identified problems.

↑ BACK TO TOP

 


Teaching and Learning Abroad

Co-Facilitators:
Inge Steglitz, Assistant Director and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Office of Study Abroad
Jim Lucas, Assistant Dean of Global Education and Curriculum in the Office of Undergraduate Education in the Provost’s Office
Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Undergraduate Education; and F&OD.

What are discussion-based teaching methods that foster critical thinking? How can we develop a learning environment that encourages students to identify and question their assumptions? How can interactive teaching strategies enhance critical thinking skills?  Please join us for a collegial discussion of how discussion-based practices enhance critical thinking across the disciplines. Using Stephen D. Brookfield’s text, Teaching for Critical Thinking, we will explore areas such as helping students to identify and check their assumptions, making discussions critical, and meeting the challenges and risks of using interactive strategies to foster critical thinking.  All MSU colleagues who employ and/or seek to learn more about critical thinking and interactive teaching strategies for small and large classes are welcome to participate in the conversation.

↑ BACK TO TOP


What Shapes the Ways We Teach? Reflecting on Teaching, Renewing Ourselves

Co-Facilitators:
Sharon Ladenson, Librarian II, Libraries
Cheryl Caesar, Assistant Professor-Fixed Term, Writing, Rhetoric & American Culture
Sponsored by F&OD.

This FLC will explore the following questions: Why do we choose certain teaching methods over others? How does interacting with students or colleagues shape our instruction? How do past learning experiences influence our current teaching practices? What creative instruction ideas do we gather from articles, books, or other resources? Reflecting on our teaching practices will facilitate, as Parker Palmer puts it, “renewing [our] sense of vocation.”

↑ BACK TO TOP



Faculty Learning Communities for 2013-2014

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.


Best Practices to Maximize Learning Experiences of International Students: Focus on China, Korea, and India

Co-Facilitators:
Fayyaz Hussain, Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science
Joseph M. Cousins, Lecturer-Fixed Term, Visiting International Professional Program
Sponsored by F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP

 


Collaborative Programmatic Assessment of Student Learning in General Science Education

Co-Facilitators:
Sarah Jardeleza, Adjunct Assistant Professor-Fixed Term, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science
Julie Libarkin, Associate Professor, Dept. of Geological Sciences and Associate Director of Education Research, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, libarkin@msu.edu,
Gabriel J. Ording, Associate Professor, Dept. of Entomology and Director, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, ordingga@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education and F&OD

This FLC is designed to help evaluate and improve the efficacy of current teaching interventions in general education science courses, especially for non-science majors (e.g., ISP and ISB courses). Members will share research findings amongst ourselves as well as through collaborative presentations, publications, and grant proposals. Since these courses are often the last science courses ever taken by non-science majors, they require evaluation beyond traditional, university-centered outcomes, to examine the role of different modalities on long-term student outcomes. This FLC can help fulfill that need with studies related to development of common learning outcomes, teaching strategies, curriculum, and assessments.

Who may be interested in joining: Faculty considering the research in or alignment of their course outcomes, assessments, and instruction in order to achieve long-term student learning, especially those teaching in the STEM disciplines.

 


Interprofessional Education in Healthcare: A Faculty Development Learning Community

Co-Facilitators:
Kathy Forrest, Instructor - Fixed Term, Nursing, forres21@msu.edu
Deborah L. Virant-Young, Assistant Professor - Fixed Term, Pharmacology Toxicology, dyoung@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by the College of Osteopathic Medicine and F&OD

This FLC will explore what Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Interprofessional Collaboration (IPC) are and how to incorporate both concepts into various health care and academic settings.  Many institutions, including those currently engaged in the delivery of patient care as well as those training the health care providers of the future, have not yet embraced these concepts. The two primary goals of the FLC will be to: 1) establish (through consensus) best practices on how to educate faculty about IPE/IPC and 2) train faculty how to incorporate IPE/IPC into their curricular model and clinical practice.

↑ BACK TO TOP

 


Learn2Design with Desire2Learn

Co-Facilitators:
Cathleen McGreal, Professor, Psychology, mcgreal@msu.edu
Jessica Knott, Information Technologist III/S, IT Services Teaching And Learning Tech
Co-sponsored by Libraries and IT Services and F&OD

This FLC is currently not accepting new members.  Please email a co-facilitator if you would like to be considered for the future.

Learning 2Design with Desire2Learn offers professors and instructors from a variety of disciplines to go beyond the basics of MSU's new learning management system, and explore its pedagogical tips, tricks, and pitfalls in a supportive group environment. Expect lively debates, learning, and community building as we discuss how to leverage what the system has to offer, and counter the areas in which it could do better. We are a creative bunch with an eye toward improving our practice as well as the experience of our students and the campus as a whole. We plan to explore (1) Effective course structures; (2) Student engagement in online and blended environments; (3) Creative activities; (4) Going beyond the PDF.  We will be reading and discussing Design for How People Learn by Julie Dirksen.  Sir Peter Blake said that, “New technology is common, new thinking is rare.” Our FLC members will be among the rare few who practice both!

↑ BACK TO TOP

 


NeGra - Networks and Graphs Workgroup

Co-Facilitators:
Zachary Neal, Assistant Professor, Psychology Social Science
Jennifer Neal, Associate Professor, Psychology Social Science
Co-sponsored by ICER and F&OD

Over the past several years, Michigan State University has hired several new faculty with expertise in network analysis.  However, because these faculty are scattered in many different departments and colleges, opportunities to build on this latent strength have been missed.  The proposed faculty learning community represents a first step toward exploring Michigan State University’s newfound but untapped potential as a major center in the rapidly expanding field of network analysis. The goal of the proposed FLC is to bring together faculty from across MSU who use network analysis in their own work, and to explore Michigan State University’s newfound but untapped potential as a major center in the rapidly expanding field of network analysis. As part of our FLC, faculty interested in research using network analysis will have the opportunity to share research ideas and explore opportunities for collaboration.  We also propose to develop a website that will highlight NeGra faculty research and provide MSU resources for learning about social network analysis. 

↑ BACK TO TOP

 


Proven Practices for Academic Success by Students of Color

Co-Facilitators:
Eunice F. Foster, Professor, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences, fosteref@msu.edu 
Gerald Urquhart,  Assistant Professor, Lyman Briggs Dean, urquhart@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives and F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP

 


Revitalizing Critical Thinking through Discussion-Based Teaching and Learning

Co-Facilitators:
Sharon Ladenson, Librarian II, Libraries
Susan Stein-Roggenbuck, Assistant Professor, James Madison College Dean
Co-sponsored by Office of the Provost, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education and F&OD

What are discussion-based teaching methods that foster critical thinking? How can we develop a learning environment that encourages students to identify and question their assumptions? How can interactive teaching strategies enhance critical thinking skills?  Please join us for a collegial discussion of how discussion-based practices enhance critical thinking across the disciplines. Using Stephen D. Brookfield’s text, Teaching for Critical Thinking, we will explore areas such as helping students to identify and check their assumptions, making discussions critical, and meeting the challenges and risks of using interactive strategies to foster critical thinking.  All MSU colleagues who employ and/or seek to learn more about critical thinking and interactive teaching strategies for small and large classes are welcome to participate in the conversation.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Teaching and Learning Abroad

Co-Facilitators:
Inge Steglitz, Assistant Director and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Office of Study Abroad, steglitz@msu.edu
Jim Lucas, Assistant Dean of Global Education and Curriculum in the Office of Undergraduate Education in the Provost’s Office
Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education and F&OD

This FLC works to advance faculty engagement in and preparation for teaching and learning abroad experiences. This preparation includes thinking about program pre-departure, re-entry, and the time actually spent abroad. There is increasing consensus in the education abroad field that there is more to study abroad teaching and learning than what happens in the classroom; however, most of the preparation study abroad faculty receive centers around issues of logistics and safety, rather than on developing models and pedagogies for holistic student learning abroad. Our group aims to develop resources designed by study abroad faculty and staff to support best practices in the field and improve student learning.

Please contact us if you…

  • Currently lead or aspire to lead study abroad programs

  • Work with study abroad students before and after their program participation

  • Would like to contribute toward advancing excellence in teaching and learning abroad

↑ BACK TO TOP


Teaching Performances Across the Curriculum

Co-Facilitators:
Christopher Scales, Associate Professor, Residential College in The Arts & Humanities Dean
Joanna Bosse, Associate Professor, Director, Residential College in The Arts & Humanities
Sponsored by F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP


Using Exploratory Writing to Support Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning Within the Disciplines

Co-Facilitators:
Nancy C. DeJoy, Associate Professor, Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures, dejoy@msu.edu
Sara D. Miller, Assistant Library Instruction Coordinator, smiller@mail.lib.msu.edu
Co-sponsored by Office of the Provost, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education and F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP

 



Faculty Learning Communities for 2012-2013

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.


Best Practices to Maximize the Learning Experiences of International Students: Focus on China, Korea, and India

Co-Facilitators:
Fayyaz Hussain, Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science, hussain3@msu.edu
Joseph M. Cousins, Lecturer-Fixed Term, Visiting International Professional Program, jcousins@msu.edu
Sponsored by F&OD

Michigan State University has been internationally known for its large pool of International students.  However, as a result of changing global economies and emerging economic powers, even larger number of international students is joining US colleges and universities.  Recently, MSU received a record number of international students including the highest ever from China.  This influx of international students creates the need for a new approach to delivery of our lectures and other material.

This FLC will provide a platform to MSU faculty, staff, and students to share their experiences with their colleagues in an informal and friendly set-up.  We will have monthly lunch meetings where we will engage our colleagues in discussions on a variety of issues related to international students. Ultimate goal is to develop tools for best practices to maximize the learning experiences of international students.

At the end of the academic year, we will present our observations to the broader MSU community and in regional professional meetings.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Collaborative Programmatic Assessment of Student Learning in General Science Education

jaradeleza.jpg

Co-Facilitators:
Sarah Jardeleza, Adjunct Assistant Professor-Fixed Term, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science
Julie Libarkin, Associate Professor, Dept. of Geological Sciences and Associate Director of Education Research, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, libarkin@msu.edu
Gabriel J. Ording, Associate Professor, Dept. of Entomology and Director, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, ordingga@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by the College of Natural Science and F&OD

This FLC is designed to help evaluate and improve the efficacy of current teaching interventions in general education science courses, especially for non-science majors (e.g., ISP and ISB courses). Members will share research findings amongst ourselves as well as through collaborative presentations, publications, and grant proposals. Since these courses are often the last science courses ever taken by non-science majors, they require evaluation beyond traditional, university-centered outcomes, to examine the role of different modalities on long-term student outcomes. This FLC can help fulfill that need with studies related to development of common learning outcomes, teaching strategies, curriculum, and assessments.

Who may be interested in joining: Faculty considering the research in or alignment of their course outcomes, assessments, and instruction in order to achieve long-term student learning, especially those teaching in the STEM disciplines.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Demystifying Discussion-Based Teaching and Learning

demystifying.jpg

Co-Facilitators:
Susan Stein-Roggenbuck, Assistant Professor, James Madison College Dean
Sharon Ladenson, Librarian II, Libraries, ladenson@msu.edu
Sponsored by F&OD

What are effective ways to stimulate discussion in the classroom? What challenges do we face as instructors when designing and utilizing interactive teaching methods? This FLC will provide a collegial forum for exchanging ideas about discussion-based instruction. Using Brookfield and Preskill’s text, Discussion as a Way of Teaching, we will explore how to incorporate interactive teaching into daily classroom practice and into course and assignment design. We will also explore how to assess the impact of discussion-based teaching on student learning. Please join us for a lively conversation about discussion-based teaching, and leave with tools, tips, and techniques for cultivating an engaging classroom. All MSU colleagues who employ and/or seek to learn more about interactive teaching methods for small and large classes are welcome to participate in the discussion.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Innovation Adoption in Sustainable Development and Placemaking

Co-Facilitators:
John Warbach, Professor, School of Planning, Design, and Construction, and Associate Director, Land Policy Instittet, warbach@msu.edu
Mark Wilson, Professor, School of Planning, Design, and Construction, wilsonmm@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by the School of Planning, Design and Construction and F&OD

The purpose of this FLC engages scholars from across disciplines to engage in a conversation about the transformation of communities to successful, resilient, and sustainable communities in the future: how to achieve innovation, leadership, and the diffusion of ideas and technology in sustainable development and placemaking. This FLC hopes to sponsor conversation, research, and events to foster increased attention and dialogue about the ineffectiveness of unsustainable—though often mainstream—views of community, to engage and promote work in building places and communities that support people, environments, and economies.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Interprofessional Education Continuing Medical Education

young.jpg

Co-Facilitators:
Jan Falls, fallsj@msu.edu 
Deborah L. Virant-Young, Assistant Professor - Fixed Term, Pharmacology Toxicology, dyoung@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by the College of Osteopathic Medicine and F&OD

This FLC will explore what Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Interprofessional Collaboration (IPC) are and how to incorporate both concepts into various health care and academic settings.  Many institutions, including those currently engaged in the delivery of patient care as well as those training the health care providers of the future, have not yet embraced these concepts.   Discussions will include a cutting edge, three seminar-series planned for MSU and FSU (Ferris State University) professional faculty and preceptors scheduled to begin in February 2013.  The two primary goals of the FLC will be to: 1) establish (through consensus) best practices on how to educate faculty about IPE/IPC and 2) train faculty how to incorporate IPE/IPC into their curricular model and clinical practice. 

↑ BACK TO TOP


A Longitudinal Exploration of Interprofessional Practice Excellence: From Faculty Development to Improved Patient Care

petsche.jpg

Co-Facilitators:
Elizabeth Petsche, Assistant Professor, Com Academic Programs, petschee@msu.edu
Susan Strouse, strouse2@msu.edu
Brandy Church, Specialist, Com Statewide Campus System, brandy.church@hc.msu.edu
Co-sponsored by the College of Osteopathic Medicine and F&OD

This FLC welcomes new members who are interested in interprofessional education in health care to join with those who participated in the FLC last year as we continue to further develop student experiences and faculty development opportunities. 

All meetings will be held the fourth Wednesday of every month beginning September 26, 2012. They will be held in East Fee Hall Room A316.

 ↑ BACK TO TOP


Leadership Skills for Faculty in a Team-Taught Curriculumbrewer.jpg

Co-Facilitators:
Patricia A. Brewer, Professor, Radiology Human Medicine, brewerp2@msu.edu 
Christopher B. Reznich, Professor, Medical Education Research & Development, reznich@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by College of Human Medicine Office of Medical Education Research and Development, College of Human Medicine Office of Academic Affairs, and F&OD

The goal of this FLC is to identify and promote leadership skills important in effective team teaching.  This will be accomplished by reading and engaging in structured discussion of the book “Shackleton’s Way: Leadership Lessons from the Great Antarctic Explorer” by Margot Morrell and Stephanie Capparell.  The meetings of this FLC will be videoconferenced between East Lansing and Grand Rapids.  Compiled notes will be distributed via Angel to all FLC members following each meeting.  It is hoped that the FLC members will be excited to share the changes they see in their leadership skills and their application to improvements in the quality of the team teaching in which they participate. 

Please join us if: 

  1. You are a faculty member engaged in team teaching.

  2. You would like to improve your ability to lead and function well in a team setting.

  3. You would like to exchange ideas with other faculty involved in team teaching.

 ↑ BACK TO TOP

 

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC)s and Other Online Educational Environments

Facilitator:
Stephen Thomas, thoma549@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies and F&OD

We will be discussing the recent trend with MOOCs and similar types of online learning models and how these models can inform and be informed by current work in online learning.

↑ BACK TO TOP

Proven Practices for Academic Success by Students of Color

Co-Facilitators:
Eunice F. Foster, Professor, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences, fosteref@msu.edu 
Gerald Urquhart,  Assistant Professor, Lyman Briggs Dean, urquhart@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives and F&OD

The objective of this FLC is to investigate procedures, methods, principles and/or practices that other post-secondary institutions have used which resulted in the attainment of academic excellence by Students of Color.  After a successful first year of exploration, investigation, and discussion, the FLC is working to obtain data on programs of interest.  Data are critical in helping to assess programmatic effectiveness.  Although descriptive information is more readily available than statistical, analytical data, we are seeking statistical, analytical data in addition to descriptive information.  Preliminary information indicates that some practices may be cross-cutting for all racial/ethnic groups and others may be specific to address needs of particular racial/ethnic groups.

The ultimate goal is to work to have MSU utilize or adopt some of the demonstrated procedures, methods, principles and/or practices to help increase the academic performance of Students of Color at MSU.

The FLC welcomes participation by all who are interested in this topic.

Our meetings will occur from 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. on the following dates: September 19; October 10; October 31; November 14; December 5. They will be held in A271 of the Plant and Soil Sciences Building

↑ BACK TO TOP


Teaching and Learning Abroad

steglitz.jpg

Co-Facilitators:
Inge Steglitz, Assistant Director and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Office of Study Abroad, steglitz@msu.edu 
Jim Lucas, Assistant Dean of Global Education and Curriculum in the Office of Undergraduate Education in the Provost’s Office
Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Undergraduate Education and F&OD

Our FLC works to advance faculty engagement in and preparation for teaching and learning abroad. There is increasing consensus in the education abroad field that there is more to study abroad teaching and learning than what happens in the classroom. However, most of the preparation study abroad faculty receive centers around issues of logistics and safety, rather than on developing models and pedagogies for holistic student learning abroad. Our group aims to develop resources designed to facilitate adoption by study abroad faculty of such practices.

Please contact us if you…

  • currently lead or aspire to lead study abroad programs

  • work with study abroad students before and after their program participation

  • would like to contribute toward advancing excellence in teaching and learning abroad

↑ BACK TO TOP


Teaching with Technology: Blended and Online Learning

Co-Facilitators:
Cathleen Erin McGreal, Professor-Fixed Term, Psychology Social Science, mcgreal@msu.edu 
Stephen Thomas, thoma549@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by Libraries and IT Services and F&OD

When used well, technology can enhance learning. As such, it is important to evaluate current trends and technologies with regards to their appropriateness and effectiveness for online and blended learning.  This year our FLC focuses on the transition from ANGEL to Desire2Learn (D2L) as the Learning Management System used at MSU.  We will explore how D2L features can be used to improve the courses we teach and to foster instructional innovations.  Faculty who would like to better understand how the new course management system can improve their face-to-face, hybrid, or fully online courses should consider joining us for these discussions.

This FLC has reached the enrollment limit. If you would like to be added to a wait list please contact the facilitators.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Transformational Learning through Creativity in STEM disciplines

Co-Facilitators:
Neeraj Buch, Associate Dean, Engineering, buch@msu.edu 
Punya Mishra, Professor, Educational Psychology and Educational Technology, punya@msu.edu
Co-sponsored by the College of Engineering and F&OD

This FLC has been postposed to the 2013-2014 academic year.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Using Exploratory Writing to Support Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning Within the Disciplines

miller.jpg

Co-Facilitators:
Nancy C. DeJoy, Associate Professor, Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures, dejoy@msu.edu
Sara D. Miller, Assistant Library Instruction Coordinator, smiller@mail.lib.msu.edu
Co-sponsored by MSU Libraries and F&OD

Making the move to inquiry-based teaching can be challenging. The purpose of this FLC is to support faculty interested in incorporating active and generative inquiry-based learning.  Our FLC will support discussions about inquiry-based learning, illustrating the ways that writing can be engaged to enact these theories, and inviting participants to relate these ideas to their specific disciplines. We will link this line of inquiry to the more general mission of the university and a focus on undergraduate education.

↑ BACK TO TOP



Faculty Learning Communities for 2011-2012

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.


 

Collaborative Programmatic Assessment of Student Learning in General Science Education

Facilitators:
Sarah Jardeleza, Research Associate, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, sarahejw@msu.edu
Julie Libarkin, Associate Professor, Dept. of Geological Sciences and Associate Director of Education Research, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, libarkin@msu.edu
Gabriel Ording, Associate Professor, Dept. of Entomology and Director, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, ordingga@msu.edu

This FLC is designed to engage  with MSU faculty who are involved  curriculum development in STEM fields and courses, with an emphasis on programs for non-science major undergraduates, such as ISB and ISP courses. These courses are often the last science course ever taken by non-science majors, and thus deserve attention to asses these programs beyond traditional, university-centered outcomes, to examine the role of different modalities on long-term student outcomes. This group will continue to engage in collaborative programmatic assessment of STEM teaching and learning. In previous years, this FLC has administered instruments to more than 3000 students and involved more than 25 faculty members. 

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Undergraduate Education and F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP


Creativity in STEM Disciplines

Facilitators: 
Neeraj Buch, Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, buch@egr.msu.edu
Punya Mishra, Professor, Educational Psychology and Educational Technology, punya@msu.edu

Engineering lies at the intersection of human desires, intentions, and technology. STEM educators will confront that disciplinary boundaries are fast eroding, and that disciplinary knowledge is evolving as well. This FLC will serve as a platform to discuss and design course learning objects to address these shifts and help members design courses in ways that promote creativity and cross-pollination of ideas from one field to another.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Effectively Engaging Students in Difficult Dialogues

Facilitators: 
Kent Workman, Instructor and Director of Student Affairs, Lyman Briggs, workman@msu.edu
Susan Stein-Roggenbuck, Visiting Assistant Professor, James Madison, steinrog@msu.edu

The purpose of this FLC is to enable faculty to explore effective ways to engage students in difficult or controversial topics in the classroom. Students do not always know how to engage effectively and appropriately with others – both students and faculty – who hold views different from their own.  Faculty members will consider ways to help students navigate these conversations civilly and with productive outcomes, both inside and outside the classroom.

Co-sponsored by the Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives and F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP


Innovation Adoption in Sustainable Development and Placemaking

Facilitators: 
John Warbach, Professor, School of Planning, Design, and Construction, and Associate Director, Land Policy Instittet, warbach@msu.edu
Mark Wilson, Professor, School of Planning, Design, and Construction, wilsonmm@msu.edu

The purpose of this FLC engages scholars from across disciplines to engage in a conversation about the transformation of communities to successful, resilient, and sustainable communities in the future: how to achieve innovation, leadership, and the diffusion of ideas and technology in sustainable development and placemaking. This FLC hopes to sponsor conversation, research, and events to foster increased attention and dialogue about the ineffectiveness of unstustainable—though often mainstream—views of community,  to engage and promote work in building places and communities that support people, environments, and economies. 

Co-sponsored by the MSU Creativity Initiative and F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP


Interprofessional Practice Excellence: Exploring Educational Models, Synergies, and Barriers

Facilitators: 
Kari Hortos, Professor of Internal Medicine, and Associate Dean, College of Osteopathic Medicine, hortos@msu.edu
Elizabeth Petsche, Assistant Professor, Surgical Specialties, College of Osteopathic Medicine, petschee@msu.edu

The focus of this FLC is to address the need for health-care professionals to develop the knowledge and skills to work in increasingly interprofessional environments. This group will focus on the curricular and pedagogical need to prepare students for working in ever-evolving contexts and, specifically, to focus on patient safety and patient-centered care and the integration of many specialties, such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, lawyers, etc.  This FLC will engage faculty in dialogue about how to impact course design to engage in creative and effective interprofessional work environments.

Co-sponsored by the MSU Creativity Initiative and F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP


Teaching and Learning Abroad

Facilitators: 
Inge Steglitz, Assistant Director and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Office of Study Abroad, steglitz@msu.edu
James Lucas, Assistant to the Dean, Undergraduate Education, lucasjam@msu.edu

The purpose of this FLC is to develop resources for the MSU academic community related to teaching and learning abroad, and to build an expanded base of faculty who are knowledgeable about education abroad.

The primary audience for this FLC is faculty and staff involved with or interested in education, teaching, and learning abroad.

The goal of this FLC is to expand the resources available to the MSU academic community for enhancing the quality of education abroad experiences for students before, during, and after their time abroad.  This FLC aims to develop a study abroad program leader toolkit and create mentoring and networking opportunities for new program leaders, among other objectives.

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Undergraduate Education and F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP


Promoting Teaching Excellence and Quality Student Learning in Integrative Studies

Facilitators: 
Christina DeJong, Director, Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science; Associate Professor, Criminal Justice, dejongc@msu.edu
Kirk Kidwell, Interim Director/Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities, kidwell@msu.edu
Gabriel Ording, Associate Professor, Dept. of Entomology and Director, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, ordingga@msu.edu

The integrative studies FLC seeks to help integrative studies faculty understand better the role and importance of integrative studies and how they might best teach such courses.  We will read literature on general education and integrative learning, investigate best teaching practices, and explore the unique challenges and opportunities such courses pose for the faculty who teach and the students who enroll in these courses.  This year, we hope to work on a collaborative effort across the Centers to create an assessment instrument (or multiple instruments) directly aligned with the Liberal Learning Goals and Outcomes that could then be administered in all IS courses.  In addition, we are interested in working with the Office of Faculty and Organizational Development to create an Online Instructional Resources page for teaching Integrative Studies courses (see /oir/online-instructional-resources).

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Undergraduate Education and F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP


Moving Ethnic Studies from the Margin to the Mainstream

Facilitators:
Andrea Louie, Associate Professor of Anthropology, louie@msu.edu
Anna Peglar-Gordon, Associate Professor, James Madison College, Gordonap@msu.edu

This FLC intends to bring different ethnic studies scholars into conversation with one another, to consider shared and varied aspects their experiences at MSU.   We will engage in scholarly discussion of the professional opportunities and challenges to faculty members whose work lies “in the margins” of their discipline, including issues of community engagement, interdisciplinary research, and publishing opportunities.  This group is targeted especially at midcareer faculty, bringing them into the academic mainstream through promotion to full professor, but will also be relevant and beneficial to more senior and junior faculty who would benefit from engagement with other scholars interested in these topics.  Our larger goal is to consider ways to bring ethnic studies research, which has often been on the periphery, to the center of traditional disciplines.

↑ BACK TO TOP


Using Exploratory Writing to Support Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning in the Disciplines

Facilitators:  
Nancy C. DeJoy, Associate Professor, Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures, dejoy@msu.edu
Sara D. Miller, Assistant Library Instruction Coordinator, smiller@mail.lib.msu.edu

Making the move to inquiry-based teaching can be challenging. The purpose of this FLC is to support faculty interested in incorporating active and generative inquiry-based learning.  Our FLC will support discussions about inquiry-based learning, illustrating the ways that writing can be engaged to enact these theories, and inviting participants to relate these ideas to their specific disciplines. We will link this line of inquiry to the more general mission of the university and a focus on undergraduate education.

Please check Semester Schedule in September for FLC meeting dates, times, and locations. 

↑ BACK TO TOP


Proven Practices to Support Academic Success for Students of Color

Facilitators:  
Eunice F. Foster, Professor, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences, fosteref@msu.edu 
Gerald Urquhart,  Assistant Professor, Lyman Briggs Dean, urquhart@msu.edu

This Faculty Learning Community (FLC) has been organized to explore best practices for helping students of color succeed academically in college.  The group is open to everyone interested in the topic, meet at least once a month. The first goal is to learn about successful efforts underway in other colleges or universities that have produced documented results of student achievement in the classroom. The second goal is to implement best practices for academic success by Students of Color in our own classes, departments, and colleges at MSU.

Co-sponsored by the Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives and F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP


Teaching with Technology:  Blended and Online Learning

Facilitators:  
Cathleen McGreal, Professor, Psychology, mcgreal@msu.edu
Brandon Blinkenberg,  e-Producer, bran@msu.edu

The goals of this FLC are to improve the use of technology in courses, to discuss and learn current and potential applications, to foster innovation, to observe courses that use technology effectively and creatively, and to survey students to learn more about current uses and preferences regarding technology and teaching.  This FLC intends to present a poster at the Spring Institute in May.

Co-sponsored by Libraries, Computing & Technology and F&OD

↑ BACK TO TOP


Faculty Learning Communities for 2010-2011

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.

Evaluating Teaching Excellence Across Academic Cultures

Facilitators:
Suzanne Lang, Associate Dean, CANR Administration/Dean, langsu@msu.edu
Pat Crawford, Associate Progessor, School of Planning, Design, and Construction, crawf203@msu.edu


Incorporating Active Learning and Inquiry-Based Learning in Large Lecture Courses

Facilitators:
Carole Robinson, carolero@msu.edu
Cy Stewart, Professor, Center for Integrative Studies, Social Science stewart@msu.edu


Inquiry-Based Problem Set Development for Molecular Cell Biology

Facilitators:
Donna Koslowsky, Associate Professor, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Com, koslwosk@msu.edu
Ron Patterson, Professor, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Com, patter13@msu.edu


Negotiating Sexual and Gender Identity as an Instructor

Facilitators:
Jeff Bale, jbale@msu.edu
David Kozishek, kozishek@msu.edu


Promoting Long-Term Retention and Student Learning in the Sciences

Facilitators:
Julie Libarkin, Associate Professor, Dept. of Geological Sciences and Associate Director of Education Research, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, libarkin@msu.edu
Gabriel Ording, Associate Professor, Dept. of Entomology and Director, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, ordingga@msu.edu


Promoting Teaching Excellence and Quality Student Learning in Integrative Studies

Facilitators:
Christina DeJong, Associate Professor, Director, Undergraduate Studies, Criminal Justice, dejongc@msu.edu
Kirk S. Kidwell, Assistant Professor/Assistant Director Center for Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities, kidwell@cal.msu.edu
Gabriel Ording, Associate Professor, Dept. of Entomology and Director, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science, ordingga@msu.edu


Supporting Graduate Students’ Scholarly Reading

Facilitators:
Alicia Alonzo, Associate Professor, Teacher Education, alonzo@msu.edu


Teaching and Learning Abroad

Facilitators:
Inge Steglitz, Assistant Director and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Office of Study Abroad, steglitz@msu.edu
Jim Lucas, Assistant Dean of Global Education and Curriculum in the Office of Undergraduate Education in the Provost’s Office


Teaching with Technology: Blended and Online Learning

Facilitators:
Cathleen McGreal, Professor, Psychology, mcgreal@msu.edu
R. Joy Durding, Instructor, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures durdingr@msu.edu


Writing in the Sciences: Teaching and Learning

Facilitators:
Terri Trupiano Barry, Visiting Assistant Professor, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures barryter@msu.edu
Michael Orth, Associate Professor, Animal Science orthm@msu.edu


X-Word Grammar and International Students Writing: New Approaches in Perspective and Technology

Facilitators:
Peter Hoffman, Instructor, English Language Center, hoffmanp@msu.edu
Akiko Ota, Specialist, English Language Center, otaakiko@msu.edu


Faculty Learning Communities for 2009-2010

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.

Promoting Teaching Excellence and Quality Student Learning in Integrative Studies

Facilitators:
Kirk S. Kidwell, Assistant Professor/Assistant Director Center for Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities, kidwell@cal.msu.edu
Rocio Quispe-Agnoli, Associate Professor/Director, Center for Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities and Department of Spanish and Portuguese,quispeag@cal.msu.edu
Christina DeJong, Associate Professor, Director, Undergraduate Studies, Criminal Justice, dejongc@msu.edu

 

This FLC proposes to help integrative studies faculty understand better the role and importance of integrative studies and how they might best teach such courses. FLC members will review the literature on general education and integrative learning, investigate best teaching practices, and explore the unique challenges and opportunities such courses pose for the faculty who teach and the students who enroll in these courses.

The primary audience for this FLC are faculty currently assigned to teach integrative studies courses in IAH, ISS, ISB, or ISP, as well as faculty who are interested in teaching integrative studies courses or who have been assigned to teach such courses in the future.

The FLC’s 2009-2010 goal is to develop a working bibliography of relevant integrative learning and general education literature, and to work collaboratively to develop an understanding of the role of integrative studies at MSU, how to best teach such courses, and how to enhance the excellence of MSU’s integrative studies approach to education.

Click here to view a PDF of this FLC’s poster presented at MSU’s 2010 Spring Institute on College Teaching and Learning


Sustainability Across the Curriculum

Facilitators:
Geoff Habron, Associate Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife and Sociology habrong@msu.edu

This FLC perceives a need to cultivate critical conversation at MSU regarding how to infuse sustainability into teaching and learning across all colleges. This includes fostering campus-wide familiarity and facility with competency-based learning and portfolio assessment.

The primary audience for this FLC is faculty, advisors and staff interested in sustainability and promoting the specialization.

Members plan to build a network of faculty, staff and advisors with familiarity with sustainability competences and program implementation; increase familiarity and use of pedagogies, content, and strategies that promote sustainability across the curriculum; refine existing competencies; generate and test assessment rubrics; and build capacity for competency assessment using electronic portfolio input and review systems.

Click here to view a PDF of this FLC’s poster presented at MSU’s 2010 Spring Institute on College Teaching and Learning: Sustainability


Teaching and Learning Abroad

Facilitators:
Inge Steglitz, Assistant Director of Study Abroad steglitz@msu.edu
James Lucas, Assistant to the Dean, International Academic Student Life lucasjam@msu.edu

In response to recommendations by the MSU Study Abroad Task Force Report and in the spirit of Internationalizing the Student Experience, there is a need for an on-going discussion related to best practices and pedagogy for education abroad instruction (before, during, and after the student's experience), research on this topic, and development of resources to support MSU faculty and staff.

This FLC is designed to provide a forum for such discussion and resource development. The goals for 2009-2010 FLC members include developing on-line resources that support high quality study abroad experiences and developing a series of workshops designed to assist program leaders with study abroad program development.

Though FLCs are intended primarily for faculty, we would like to invite anyone to submit an application for membership who...

  • currently leads or aspires to lead a study abroad program

  • orks with study abroad students before and after their program participation

  • would like to participate as we work toward advancing excellence in teaching and learning abroad

Click here to view a PDF of this FLC’s poster presented at MSU’s 2010 Spring Institute on College Teaching and Learning: Teaching and Learning Abroad


Quality Issues in Online Learning

Facilitators:
Cathleen McGreal, Associate Professor, Psychology mcgreal@msu.edu
R. Joy Durding, Instructor, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures durdingr@msu.edu

There is considerable interest in improving the quality of online and blended courses at Michigan State University. Each year at the Spring Institute the eproducers at the Virtual University offer a workshop on Blended Learning. Our FLC is resource for those attending this workshop to meet with other individuals across various disciplines who are incorporating technology into their teaching. Although the focus is on online learning the range is from fully online classes to blended enriched courses. There is considerable variation in terms of experience and so the FLC functions at times as a source of support and mentoring.

The FLC will itself also function as a hybrid/blended community through our ANGEL Group site.

The proposed audience includes individuals actively engaged in online or blended course preparation or teaching.

The 2009-2010 FLC goals are to integrate course readings into individual projects. In addition, group projects will be added to the Learning Object Repository (LOR) created by the 2008-2009 FLC so that members can benefit through these shared learning objectives.

FLC-QualityIssuesInOnlineLearning


Science Writing: Teaching and Learning

Facilitators:
Terri Trupiano Barry, Visiting Assistant Professor, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures barryter@msu.edu
Michael Orth, Associate Professor, Animal Science orthm@msu.edu

One of the most common complaints of prospective employers of graduating seniors in the sciences is their inability to write well. In fact The National Commission on Writing reported that companies may spend over $3 billion dollars to help remedy deficiencies in the writing skills of their employees (Report of 2004). We believe that by creating a cohort of teachers in the sciences and writing, we can begin to ameliorate this problem on our campus.

The FLC's 2009-2010 goals include reading and discussing readings on student-centered learning and teaching portfolios; observing FLC colleagues' classes; creating a website for designing effective writing assignments in the sciences; and developing ways for more collaboration across colleges to implement more writing in the sciences.


Effective Teaching in Large Classes

Facilitators:
Fred Jacobs, Associate Professor, Accounting and Information Systems jacobs@bus.msu.edu
Jon Stoltzfus, Instructor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology stoltzfu@msu.edu

Virtually every MSU student enrolls in at least one large class during their first two years, with the University offering numerous large classes across almost all disciplines. Effective instruction in large classes typically demands instructional approaches that are different than those that work in classes of 30-50 students, and faculty who teach large courses may not be familiar with some of these methods for engaging large classes. This Learning Community is designed to facilitate discussion among those who teach large classes to share best practices with other instructors. This FLC has the potential to affect the learning of many students across the MSU campus.

The FLC's 2009-2010 goals include visiting the classes of faculty who have been recognized for their work with large classes, followed by structured debriefings; exploring how faculty teaching large classes are evaluated, and disseminating best practices.

Click here to view a PDF of this FLC’s poster presented at MSU’s 2010 Spring Institute on College Teaching and Learning: Effective Teaching in Large Classes


Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment

Facilitators:
Fayyaz Hussain, Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science hussain3@msu.edu
Richard Lee, Specialist-Advisor, Supportive Services Program leer@msu.edu

This FLC is designed to be an experiential and personal exploration of one's understanding of how our encounters in life impact not only us but others in the classroom and beyond. The format is intended for every participant to be not only a learner, but also an instructor. This FLC is based on the premise that the more we learn about ourselves, the more effectively we can interact with those who are different from us. By sharing experiences and life-changing incidents through activities, guest speakers, special readings and inter-group dialogue, it is anticipated that each person will proceed along a course of reflective self-development. Differences discussed may include; class, gender, gender identity, race/ethnicity, age, religion, capabilities and others. The ultimate goal is that each participant will leave with a toolbox of useful methodologies to integrate healthy and productive approaches into their pedagogies as they relate to living in a diverse world.

Click here to view a PDF of this FLC’s poster presented at MSU’s 2010 Spring Institute on College Teaching and Learning: Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment


Faculty Learning Communities for 2008-2009

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.

Sustainability Across the Curriculum

Facilitators:
Geoff Habron, Associate Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife and Sociology habrong@msu.edu

This FLC perceives a need to cultivate critical conversation at MSU regarding how to infuse sustainability into teaching and learning across all colleges. This includes fostering campus-wide familiarity and facility with competency-based learning and portfolio assessment.

The primary audience for this FLC is faculty, advisors and staff interested in sustainability and promoting the specialization.

Members plan to build a network of faculty, staff and advisors with familiarity with sustainability competences and program implementation; increase familiarity and use of pedagogies, content, and strategies that promote sustainability across the curriculum; refine existing competencies; generate and test assessment rubrics; and build capacity for competency assessment using electronic portfolio input and review systems.


Advancing Global Competence through Teaching and Learning Abroad

Facilitators:
Inge Steglitz, Assistant Director of Study Abroad steglitz@msu.edu
James Lucas, Assistant to the Dean, International Academic Student Life lucasjam@msu.edu

In response to the MSU Study Abroad Task Force Report and in the spirit of Internationalizing the Student Experience, there is a need for an on-going discussion related to best practices and pedagogy for education abroad instruction (before, during, and after the student’s experience), research on this topic, and development of resources to support MSU faculty and staff.

This will include the continuation of the discussion and ideas presented during last spring’s Best Practices in Experiential Education conference. This FLC is designed to provide a forum for such discussion and resource development. Though FLCs are intended primarily for faculty, we would like to invite anyone to submit an application for membership who…

  • currently leads or aspires to lead a study abroad program

  • works with study abroad students before and after their program participation

  • would like to participate as we work toward advancing excellence in teaching and learning abroad


Learning About Our Learners

Facilitators:
Jeno Rivera, Assistant Professor, CARRS jeno@msu.edu
Glenn Sterner, Senior Director, Bailey Scholars Program sternerg@msu.edu

Are you interested in understanding who our students are? Do you wish you could better reach your students? Do you feel disconnected from this generation of students? Our students are constantly changing in attitudes, needs, and expectations. This Faculty Learning Community named “Learning about our Learners” is open to anyone interested in exploring who are students are, how they learn, and how we can better help them learn. It is open to all faculty, academic specialists and graduate students at MSU, and we are looking for individuals to begin our journey of exploring this exciting and important topic.


Quality Issues in Online Learning (formerly focusing on Challenges and Opportunities in Blended 'Teaching and Learning')

Facilitators:
Cathleen McGreal, Associate Professor, Psychology mcgreal@msu.edu
R. Joy Durding, Instructor, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures durdingr@msu.edu

Blended courses (hybrid) are those in which there is a mixture of traditional classroom pedagogies and computer-based technologies. But teaching courses using hybrid or blended instructional technology is relatively new territory for many faculty and staff. Although the use of online technology in courses can be a powerful enhancement to the learning experience, it presents unique challenges for both teachers and students. This FLC provides an opportunity for faculty and staff to communicate and explore the challenges of teaching such courses and to network with other colleagues who are experimenting with these new technologies. The FLC will itself also function as a hybrid/blended community through our ANGEL Group site.


Scientists and Writers: Sharing Our Knowledge of Teaching Writing in the Biological Sciences

Facilitators:
Terri Trupiano Barry, Visiting Assistant Professor, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures barryter@msu.edu
Michael Orth, Associate Professor, Animal Science orthm@msu.edu

Are you looking for new ways to help students write better lab reports or research projects? Do you wonder how you can squeeze teaching about writing into your syllabus when it is already overfilled with content that must be covered? As a writing teacher, are you stymied by your lack of knowledge about the conventions of scientific writing? In this FLC, writing teachers and science teachers can come together to learn from each other. Topics we investigate include developing writing assignments, responding to student writing, writing in different genres, and using writing assignments to help students learn content. We also study well-written articles from major journals to discuss ways to make the subtleties of science writing more visible for students. A major goal of this FLC is a reciprocal exchange of information on methods of facilitating student development as writers--writing teachers learning from scientists and scientists learning from writing teachers. The ultimate purpose of the FLC is to facilitate student writing in both Tier I and Tier II courses and to open lines of communication across the disciplines to foster an environment of mutual support between teachers in the sciences and in writing.


Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment

Facilitators:
Fayyaz Hussain, Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science hussain3@msu.edu
Richard Lee, Specialist-Advisor, Supportive Services Program leer@msu.edu

This FLC is designed to be an experiential and personal exploration of one’s understanding of how our encounters in life impact not only us but others in the classroom and beyond. The format is intended for every participant to be not only a learner, but also an instructor. This FLC is based on the premise that the more we learn about ourselves, the more effectively we can interact with those who are different from us. By sharing experiences and life-changing incidents through activities, guest speakers, special readings and inter-group dialogue, it is anticipated that each person will proceed along a course of reflective self-development. Differences discussed may include; class, gender, gender identity, race/ethnicity, age, religion, capabilities and others. The ultimate goal is that each participant will leave with a toolbox of useful methodologies to integrate healthy and productive approaches into their pedagogies as they relate to living in a diverse world.


Enhancing the First-Year Experience at MSU

Facilitators:
Kirk Kidwell, Assistant Director and Visiting Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities kidwell@msu.edu
Todd Tarrant, Senior Academic Specialist, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science tarrantt@msu.edu

The Boldness by Design task force on Enhancing the Student Experience foregrounds improving the first-year experience as essential to enhancing the overall student experience at MSU. As the Task Force report observes, “The freshman experience is absolutely critical to establishing the foundation for undergraduate education.” In the spirit of this initiative, this FLC seeks to foster a culture of teaching and learning that will enhance the first-year experience of students at MSU. The group member survey the existing scholarship on the first-year experience, investigate effective first-year teaching practices, and explore strategies for promoting first-year student success. We take a holistic approach to the first-year experience, drawing from and engaging with not only teaching faculty but also student services, residential life, and academic advising.


Effective Teaching in Large Classes

Facilitators:
Fred Jacobs, Associate Professor, Accounting and Information Systems jacobs@bus.msu.edu
Jon Stoltzfus, Instructor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology stoltzfu@msu.edu

Virtually every MSU student enrolls in at least one large class during their first two years, with the University offering numerous large classes across almost all disciplines. Effective instruction in large classes typically demands instructional approaches that are different than those that work in classes of 30-50 students, and faculty who teach large courses may not be familiar with some of these methods for engaging large classes. This Learning Community is designed to facilitate discussion among those who teach large classes to share best practices with other instructors. This FLC has the potential to affect the learning of many students across the MSU campus.


Experimental Approaches to Teaching Writing across the Curriculum

Facilitators:
Marya Sosulski, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work sosulski@msu.edu
David Sheridan, Assistant Professor, Residential College sherid16@msu.edu

The FLC is open to all instructors—new and experienced—who want to discuss the rewards and challenges of using innovative classroom techniques for promoting critical thinking through writing. The group meets twice monthly to discuss teaching philosophy and novel methods for content delivery, active learning, and evaluation and assessment. Members will receive John Bean’s book Engaging Ideas and other materials to work through during the year. Members bring writing assignments that they have discovered to enhance and assess students' critical thinking and skills. The workshop approach helps members improve assignments over the course of the semester; many will be adapted to an online format. Through this format we will explore innovative approaches such as games and simulations, integrative and experiential learning, and immersion experiences.Inter-disciplinary relationships are encouraged, so that students can connect course content across classes, and at different levels. FLC members track their own and students’ progress and gauge the effectiveness and efficiency of the writing assignments for assessing students’ work and determining the best use of instructors' time and feedback to students.


Faculty Learning Communities for 2007-2008

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.

Effective Teaching in Large Classes

Facilitators:
Fred Jacobs, Associate Professor, Accounting and Information Systems
Michael Masterson, Academic Specialist, Mathematics


Experimental Approaches to Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum (EATWAC), or Thinking Outside the box and other Pedagogical Puzzles

Facilitators:
Marya Sosulski, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work
David Sheridan, Assistant Professor, Residential College


Challenges and Opportunities in Blended Teaching and Learning

Facilitators:
Cathleen McGreal, Associate Professor, Psychology mcgreal@msu.edu
R. Joy Durding, Instructor, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures durdingr@msu.edu


Scientists and Writers: Sharing Our Knowledge of Teaching Writing in the Biological Sciences

Facilitators:
Terri Trupiano Barry, Visiting Assistant Professor, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures barryter@msu.edu
Michael Orth, Associate Professor, Animal Science orthm@msu.edu


Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment

Facilitators:
Sandra Combs, Instructor, Journalism slcombs@msu.edu
Fayyaz Hussain, Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science hussain3@msu.edu


Enhancing the First-Year Experience at MSU

Facilitators:
Kirk Kidwell, Assistant Director and Visiting Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities kidwell@msu.edu
Todd Tarrant, Senior Academic Specialist, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science tarrantt@msu.edu


Faculty Learning Communities for 2006-2007

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.

Challenges and Opportunities in Blended Teaching and Learning

Facilitators:
Cathleen McGreal, Associate Professor, Psychology mcgreal@msu.edu
Paul Freddolino, Professor, Social Work


Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment

Facilitators:
Sandra Combs, Instructor, Journalism slcombs@msu.edu
Fayyaz Hussain, Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science


Enhancing the First-Year Experience at MSU

Facilitators:
Kirk Kidwell, Assistant Director and Visiting Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities kidwell@msu.edu
Todd Tarrant, Senior Academic Specialist, Center for Integrative Studies in General Science tarrantt@msu.edu


Scientists and Writers: Sharing Our Knowledge of Teaching Writing in the Biological Sciences

Facilitators:
Terri Trupiano Barry, Visiting Assistant Professor, Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures barryter@msu.edu
Michael Orth, Associate Professor, Animal Science orthm@msu.edu


Faculty Learning Communities for 2005-2006

To learn more about the work of these FLCs, contact the facilitators listed below.

Scholarly Discussions on Problem Solving

Facilitators:
Jon Patterson, Associate Professor, Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation
John Dirkx


MindGames: Teaching and Learning with Games and Simulations​

Facilitators:
Punya Mishra, Assistant Professor, Learning, Technology and Culture Program
Brian Winn, Assistant Professor, Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media


Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment

Facilitators:
Fayyaz Hussain, Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science
Eric Williams


Hybrid Learning: Strategies, tactics and implementation

Facilitators:
Paul Freddolino
Steve Triezenberg, Adjunct Professor, Biochemistry & Moleculaar Biology


Confronting the Challenges of Teaching Hybrid/Blended Courses

Facilitators:
Kirk Kidwell, Assistant Director and Visiting Assistant Professor, Center for Integrative Studies in Arts and Humanities kidwell@msu.edu
Antoinette WinklerPrins , Visiting Adjunct Associate Professor, Geography


Teaching Writing in the Disciplines

Facilitators:
Janet Swenson, Associate Dean, AI Outreach
David Sheridan, Assistant Professor, Residential College sherid16@msu.edu


An Extended Conversation about Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

Facilitators:
Kathleen Hoag, Assistant Professor, Medical Technology Program
Jon Patterson, Associate Professor, Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation


Visual Literacy and Pedagogy

Facilitators:
Steve Rohs, Assistant Professor, James Madison College, Program
Colleen Tremonte, Associate Professor, James Madison College


Mind Games: Teaching and Learning with Games and Simulation

Facilitators:
Punya Mishra, Assistant Professor, Learning, Technology and Culture Program
Brian Winn, Assistant Professor, Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media


If you have questions or comments, please contact the Office of Faculty and Organizational Development, at 432-2033 or facdevel@msu.edu.